background

juleesamuli@sbcglobal.net

925.699.4410

PRIVACY POLICY - MEMBERS ONLY

Purchase required to use this site. In using this training site, you agree to the privacy policy: This is for member use only. Please do not share, copy, post, forward or otherwise distribute the link, URL address, or any of the material from this site without written consent from Limitless Pawsibilities. This includes the descriptions, infographics, photos, videos, video links, and all written material.

© 2020 Limitless Pawsibilities

All Rights Reserved

L2-Topics      L2-Social       L2-FCC1      L2-FCC2      L2-A&C      L2-RP2      L2-WWM      L2-BG     L2-Week8

L3-Topics      L3-Social       L3-DIS      L3-NRG      L3-ART      L3-STAY      L3-WWM      L3-GO!

Welcome to the Final Frontier!

Make sure that you save the link to this site - it is not accessible from the public site or from Level 1 or Level 2. You can access Level 1 (blue tool bar) and Level 2 (green tool bar) from here. If you do lose the link, or have trouble accessing the site, email me at nolimit4paws@gmail.com and I will send you the link again.

(placeholder)

Welcome to Remote Training

Level 3

Working with the Ultimate Companion

(placeholder)

Table of Contents

This is a list of all your handouts and videos by category and which week I typically train them, but you are also free to skip around a bit if something is a priority based on your puppy's behavior. The orange tool bar is for access to all the different categories included in this level. Level 3 is divided into eight pages.

L3-Topics is this page. It contains information on behavioral changes in adolescence and more advanced training strategies.

L3-Social is your socialization page that helps you build critical concepts and guides you through challenges in socialization for the older puppy and adolescent.

Themes are once again focused on at this level.

Certain games might be in multiple sections because of the relevance to the subject in which they address. Some games your puppy will be ready to start now. Others might be more advanced and will be played in the future. Certain games will have prerequisites or previous levels that will need to be played to proficiency before moving on. Those games will be listed in order or state prerequsites in the description.

L3-DIS Distractions: There are some basic princiapls you need to teach your dog on how to handle distractions. These games address how to teach your dog to work through distractions, using you as the gateway to amazing things.

L3-STAY Stay: This cue and the requirements for it to be reliable in a n umber of situations are laid out in this section.

L3-ART Advanced Recall Training: Work through advanced games for teaching recalls and working through distractions.

L3-WWM Walking With Manners: Fine tune focus and impulse control when out and about on walks.

L3-NRG Energy: There are two types of energy. Physical energy and mental energy. You must address both and know what to do with it - that is what this section is about. Focus on how to channel that new found physical energy into contructive outlets that involve you! Support your efforts in teaching recalls, walking with manners, focus, impulse control, and confidence all in these higher energy games. Build your value and be the center of excitement and fun. Continue your work between arousal up and arousal down by mixing in mental workouts. Mental challenges go far in satiating a dog's energy needs. Utilize brain games to build focus and confidence and keep your smart dog happy.

L3-GO! Game On! You've completed the ultimate companion package and now it is up to you to continue the practice and build the concepts through your life with your amazing dog. Unleash the potential and GO!

The games for each week list the concepts they develop so you can use that as a reference during your training, depending on what you need to work on with your pup.

BEHAVIOR TOPICS:

Adolescent Chewing..............THIS PAGE

Adolescent Guide..................THIS PAGE

Emotions and Behavior..........THIS PAGE

Reactivity............................THIS PAGE

Thinking In Arousal...............THIS PAGE

TRAINING TOPICS:

Checklist...................................L3-GO!

Exercise Truths.....................THIS PAGE

Game Guide..............................L3-GO!

Generalization......................THIS PAGE

Long Lines................................L3-ART

Recall Review............................L3-ART

Schedules of Reinforcement...THIS PAGE

SOCIALIZATION:

DMT Details............................L3-Social

Movement Revisit....................L3-Social

Noise Work 2..........................L3-Social

Cardboard Chaos....................L3-Social

Harness Game........................L3-Social

Muzzle Game..........................L3-Social

Noise Box...............................L3-Social

Noise Work.............................L3-Social

Paws On Game........................L3-Social

Paws On Next Steps.................L3-Social

Sniff It Out.............................L3-Social

DISTRACTIONS (DIS):

5 Games for Focus......................L3-DIS

Magic Hand................................L3-DIS

Orientation Distraction Basics.......L3-DIS

Premack Testing 1, 2, 3...............L3-DIS

Premack Reliability......................L3-DIS

Wait Front Doors.........................L3-DIS

ADVANCED RECALL TRAINING (ART):

Clip Unclip.................................L3-ART

FUNder......................................L3-ART

Long Lines.................................L3-ART Middle Tunnel Tag.......................L3-ART

Orientation Distractions Basics......L3-ART

Recall with Distractions Basics......L3-ART

Recall Review.............................L3-ART

Run By Rewards.........................L3-ART


WALKING WITH MANNERS (WWM):

5 Games for Focus....................L3-WWM

Distractions.............................L3-WWM

Emergency U-Turns...................L3-WWM

Fine Tuning..............................L3-WWM

Giving In to Leash Pressure.......L3-WWM

Heel Basics..............................L3-WWM

Heel Basics Outside..................L3-WWM

Magic Hand..............................L3-WWM

Orientation Distractions Basics...L3-WWM

Orientation Real-Life.................L3-WWM

Target Walking.........................L3-WWM

Movement Exercises Foundation.L1Week4

WWM Out & About....................L1Week4

WWM LLW...............................L2-WWM

STAY (STAY):

Paws On Duration.....................L3-STAY

Premack Testing 1, 2, 3.............L3-STAY

Premack Reliability....................L3-STAY

Stay Part 1..............................L3-STAY

Stay Part 2..............................L3-STAY

Stay Part 3..............................L3-STAY

ENERGY: EXERCISE BODY & MIND (NRG):

Behavior Chains Foundation........L3-NRG

Close-Wrapped Play...................L3-NRG

FUNder.....................................L3-NRG

Leg Weaves..............................L3-NRG

Middle Tunnel Tag......................L3-NRG

Middle Mania.............................L3-NRG

Paws On Advanced (Pivoting)......L3-NRG

Paws On Target.........................L3-NRG

Premack Testing 1, 2, 3..............L3-NRG

Spin.........................................L3-NRGStand.......................................L3-NRG

GAME ON! (GO!):

Chaining Games.........................L3-GO!

Game On!..................................L3-GO!

Orientation Real-Life...................L3-GO!

Toy Switching Details - Tug!.........L3-GO!

Train, Play, Bond........................L3-GO!



OBEDIENCE CUES:

Behavior Chains.........................L3-NRG

Heel Basics..............................L3-WWM

Heel Basics Outside..................L3-WWM

Leg Weaves...............................L3-NRG

Middle Tunnel Tag.......................L3-ART

Premack Reliability......................L3-DIS

Premack Testing.........................L3-NRG

Recall Challenges........................L3-ART

Recall with Basic Distractions........L3-ART

Run By Rewards..........................L3-ART

Spin.........................................L3-NRG

Stand.......................................L3-NRG

Stay Part 1...............................L3-STAY

Stay Part 2...............................L3-STAY

Stay Part 3...............................L3-STAY

Wait with Distractions..................L3-DIS

CONCEPTUAL GAMES:

5 Games for Focus......................L3-DIS

Clip Unclip.................................L3-ART

Close Wrapped Play....................L3-NRG

FUNder.....................................L3-NRG

Game On!..................................L3-GO!

Magic Hand..............................L3-WWM

Middle Mania.............................L3-NRG

Middle Tunnel Tag.......................L3-ART

Orientation Distractions Basics.......3-ART

Orientation Real Life...................L3-GO!

Paws On Advanced (Pivoting).......L3-NRG

Paws On Duration......................L3-STAY

Paws On Target..........................L3-NRG

Proximity Magnet......................L3-WWM

Proximity Magnet Outside..........L3-WWM

Train, Play, Bond.........................L3-GO!

Toy Switching Details...................L3-GO!


Each topic, skill, cue or game has a written explanation on the site. Videos are posted below their corresponding subject. There is also a button for a PDF download which will explain the topic, skill, cue or game in more detail. This might include step-by-step instructions, why or when you would use the cue, and the concepts a game teaches and how it applies to real life with your dog.

LEVEL 3 TOPICS


Thinking in Arousal

Your dog is not being stubborn! Ignoring cues in exciting situations, like at the park, playing with other dogs, hiking a trail, or even on a walk is not because your dog is intentionally blowing you off. Thinking in arousal has to be trained. There is point in every dog when the brain shifts from fornt brain “thinking” to hind brain ”reacting.” This naural shift happens when arousal is higher. That threshold will differ from dog to dog. Some are naturally better at remaining in the front brain longer than others. This is where you can see a dog ability to maintain focus and have some self-control - concepts that are easier for some than others.

Arousal Up, Arousal Down is not a game. It is a way of life with your dog. Working through arousal levels gradualy with games, helps your dog to increase the threshold of staying in the front brain. Games mold the brain and thought processes in your dog. So in order to have a dog that listens better and follows cues even in exciting situations, you will need to play your games and bring arousal levels up and down. This also gives your dog the skill to calm down more quickly, empty the arousal bucket more efficiently, and handle situations better.

Emotions and Behavior

It is important to remember that behavior is rooted in emotion. Your dog barks for a reason, and an emotion is driving the behavior. So when you are needing to address a behavior, in order to truly steer your dog in the right direction, you need to address your puppy on an emotional level.

Emotions can be positive or negative. As outlined on the DMT chart, calm and excitement are positive emotions, anxiety and fear are negative. The tricky part is that the same behaviors can manifest from different emotions. So understanding your dog, learning body cues, and being observant is going to be helpful for you to know how to address behaviors you don’t like.

Punishment and punitive tactics can be effective in some situations, and makes things worse in others. Punishing fear makes the fear worse, while comforting your dog when he is fearful makes you a place of safety and builds trust. Trust is very dependent on keeping your dog safe and knowing what that is. When using tools that cause pain or discomfort, negative associations can be made, and negative emotions are validated and can get worse. This can damage your relationship. A dog that trusts you will learn how to let you handle the situation and keep the dog safe so the dog does not have to respond. That is why you need to be very careful and stay away from punitive methods until you dog is through adolescence, at least.

I also feel that it is not fair to punish a dog when they don’t know or understand right from wrong. This is why I don’t use punishment (positive punishment and negative reinforcement) with puppies. I save that for when I know they know better and the dog is intentionally being naughty. You know when your dog is intentionally making the wroing choice - he has that look in his eye!

Punishment can also suppress behavior and low-level warning signs could get skipped. Behavior is communication, and we need to listen. Punishing a behavior will lead to your dog choosing a different one to cope, and that new behavior could be worse thanthe previous one.

Postive reinforcement does not come without consequences. In order for training to be effective, your dog must not get something they want if it wasn’t earned in some way. Proper behavior leads to the things your dog wants and needs. Mistakes simply mrean that the reward is not given. Witholding rewards is a form of punishment but it does not damage your relationship or trust. Those are two pieces that are ciritcal during aldoescence when confidence can drop.

Life should not always have to be challenging or hard. Confidence is reinforced with success, not failure. Joy can be found in the simplest things.

Adolescent Chewing

As your puppy grows, the behavior will change. When puppies get close to teething (average age is five months, but it can happen sooner or later than that), chewing habits will change as the gums swell and get sensitive and when teeth get loose. Additionally, when the adult teeth begin to come in, they perform very differently than puppy teeth - they are far more efficient with chewing through things.

You will need to be diligent when the time comes, to keep an eye on your puppy and make sure he has access to plenty of appropriate things to chew, and prevent access to inappropriate things either through supervision or using management tools. Too much freedom too soon creates holes in training, and bad habits can form that can be very hard to break!!!

Chewing is energy. You will see an increase in energy as adolescence approaches, and need to up your game when it comes to exercise, both physical and mental. Don't underestimate the power of mental stimulation and how well it can tire out a dog without building physical endurance. Additionally, do not be afraid of the energy your puppy has - use your games to work through arousal levels and see the positive side of your puppy's energy.

Remember not to leave harnesses on - if your adolescent is not "busy" in an activity or you are not diligently watching, your pup can chew through the harness - and it can happen fast! It's happened to me with a couple of my dogs!

That is the time where destructive chewing can start!

As they enter adolescence, energy will increase, and exercise needs will change. Excess energy can also manifest into chewing, so get yourself ready and be prepared to avoid destructive chewing.


Reactivity

You want your dog to be reactive to you, not the environment or the things in it.

  • Establish this behavior, focusing on you, every time you go outside. Set precedence. Paying attention to you and engaging with you comes first. Engaging in the environment comes second.
  • Your value and relationship are big factors in the decisions made by your dog. The higher your value, the more your dog will choose you over other things.
  • Be a source of motivation. Don’t get stingy with rewards. Be part of the energy and excitement. Control can stifle motivation. Use a variety of rewards - fun, affection praise, food, toys, etc.
  • Be a source of excitement and play. Your games achieve this for you. Games utilize natural dog behaviors that are reinforcing. And you are a part of that process which builds on your relationship and your dog's value in the team.
  • When a dog engages in self-entertainment, you are not needed. Though dog-driven play is important, play with you should take precedence.

Emotions Drive Reactivity

  • Emotions can be positive or negative in nature.
  • How your dog feels about something can determine if the distraction could become a reward or not, and what would be rewarding for your dog - getting closer or farther away.
  • Anticipation of and event can be just as exciting or scary as the actual event itself. Ditch the routine and don't follow patterns your dog can anticipate.
  • Use your games to set appropriate associations and emotions around certain things. Calm and confident games: DMT, all socialization games, Reward Nothing, Calming Touch, and boundaries. Choose me mot that games: Toy Switching (tug), Fetch FUN Back Away, Orientation games, Pick Me, Proximity games, Magic Hand, 5 Games for Focus, etc.

Arousal: Positive Emotions

  • Certain distractions can become rewards.
  • Premack is the cue for permission. Dog must be given permission and trained to wait for permission. This is what the Premack games accomplish.
  • Your dog should listen and focus on you first. Then you can give your dog permission to engage with the distraction. What you want your dog to do first is up to you and dependent on the situation. Your dog gets the “reward” ONLY if the work for you is done. You have to be prepared to walk away if you dog does not do his job first.
  • This boosts your value because you are part of the path to the reinforcement. You are the gateway to exciting things! That boosts your value and the value of doing things for you. Teamwork becomes important. This is the Premack Principle.

Arousal: Negative Emotions

  • Distance or leaving the situation is what your dog needs. By doing this you keep your dog feeling comfortable and help your dog to feel better. Have a positive way to do this - Emergency U-Turn, DMT, Fetch FUN Back Away, Orientation/Pick Me, etc.
  • That builds trust. For trust is keeping your dog safe and knowing what the is for your dog.
  • Build pertinent concepts at home to give your dog coping skills. Confidence and calmness are top priorities. Focus is another one.
  • Give your dog a nice break from whatever the situation was that caused the fear or anxiety. This allows your dog’s bucket to empty so he will have room to better handle the situation when it happens again. It can take 72 hours or more to recover from a stressful situation.
  • Repetative revisits to the same situation at the same intensity can cause sensitization. Change your tactics. Work low levels first and build confidence and trust. Teach your dog that you will take care of it so your dog does not have to do it. Games like Noise Work help with the sounds of the situation (crowd noise, kids playing, dogs barking, etc.). Other concept games to boost confidence are critical and should be played at home and in environments where your dog is comfortable. DMT is crucial!

Over-Arousal - Why Cues Won’t Work

  • For starters, cues are boring.
  • Cues are you controlling your dog instead of your dog learning to control himself.
  • A dog in high or over-arousal might be unable to think clearly, if that has not been trained (see Thinking in Arousal). A dog in over-arousal literally can not hear your voice or understand your words. Your dog is on auuto-pilot and reacting instinctually to the situation to feel better.

Concepts Mold the Brain

  • Conceptual games utilize natural dog behaviors to shape responses (catching, chasing, searching, etc.) into desired ones: return to me, focus on me, choose me, stay close to me, etc.
  • Your training games influence the decision-making process, and put value in appropriate ones.
  • Games are fun in a variety of situations, build necessary skills, work through different energy levels, and the concepts they build can be strengthened outside of challenging situations. Concepts also transfer far better than cues to real-life situations and provide you with better results.

Stacking

Stacking is the process in which events that create emotional responses pile on top of each other and raise arousal levels. That fills up your dog's bucket. Once your dog’s bucket is full, he no longer has the ability to cope and make good decisions. Another event that increases emotion sends the dog over the edge and now your dog is barking or lunging, etc. He reaches into his emotion behavior box and pulls out a behavior he knows well (defualt doggie behavior). The goal is to make himself feel better with a behavior that he knows works, or has worked in the past for various situations.

This is why your dog can pass by people or dogs fine at first, but then all of a sudden reacts. You can’t ascertain what it was about that person or dog that wasdifferent. The truth of the matter is that there wasn’t a particular thing about the distraction that caused your dog to react, it was your dog’s bucket - it was full.

Beginning activities when your dog is in a level of calmness, gives you more room to work within your dog’s bucket. Making choices on what the activity is going to be or where you are going to go should depend on what you think your dog’s bucket status is in that moment. Sometimes you will guess wrong, and you will have to change your plans. Sometimes you will guess right, and things will go well.


Sensitization vs Desensitization (Habituation)

Sensitization: The process in which the repetative exposure to a stimulus (distraction) intensifies an emotional response and behavior gets worse. This commonly happens with sounds, and why so many dogs are sesitive to thunder and fireworks, but it can happen with anything. Prediction plays a roll - the snticipation of the situation triggers and emotional response and brings arousal levels up. This is often what happens when out and about, and there is a visual cue that let’s your dog know what is going to happen soon - the backyard with the barking dog, the busy street corner, the narrow path that bike race through, etc.

Pesimistic dogs are more likely to sensitize than optimistic dogs. Using DMT to begin to shift emotions is helpful, and why DMT is not a puppy thing but a dog thing. There are certain things in the world I don’t want my dogs to sensitize too, and why I use DMT with them even in old age.

Desensitization (Habituation): The process in which the repetitive exposure to a stimulus (distraction) decreases an emotional response and behavioral reactions lessen or may stop all together. The dog develops the capability to ignore the distraction, for it is no longer significant. The dog is able to remain calm.

Optimistic and confident dogs have some advantages to habituation, in that they don’t view many things as threats. They also tend to have better coping skills that aid them in learning to ignore things in the environment.

What You Can Do:

  • Play concept games that build confidence, optimism and calmness outside of the challenging situations. Build skills that help your dog cope and make good decisions. DMT, Noise Work, Sniff It Out, Noise Box, Boundary Games, Orientation Games, Pick Me, Middle, Reward Nothing, Reward Anything, Cardboard Chaos, Scatter Feeding, Magic Hand, Muzzle Game, etc.
  • Step in when needed to support your dog and build positive associations. Do this right from the start before reactions begin where possible - don’t leave things to chance.
  • Adopt a no pressure attitude - move farther away, avoid situations for a while, observe at a distance, or leave. Pressure causes stress. Constantly revisiting scary or ever-exciting situations can be too much and make things worse, not better.
  • Don’t overload your dog. It can take 72 hours or more for stress to subside and for your dog to sufficiently empty the bucket.
  • Choose other places or other activities to do with your dog. not all dogs are build to be able to handle everything. Do what works for your dog and enjoy those moments.

Adolescence

As your puppy grows over the next few months, you will see changes in behavior. Some may be mild or short lived, others may not. As hormones fluctuate during preadolescence, starting when the teeth being to fall out, behavior will begin to change - we are our hormones!

ENERGY AND AROUSAL - during adolescence, energy peaks. So what you have been ding with your puppy, will no longer be enough for your adolescent. But I warn you… just letting your dog “run it out” is a road to trouble. Understanding arousal and how it affects behavior is important. Being in higher arousal, and choosing doggie self-rewarding behaviors and experimenting with independence is an adolescent dream, but also leads to problem behaviors. Physical exercises builds endurance! So make sure that the exercise you provide has structure and provides mental exercise. Continue working the concept in your Arousal Up, Arousal Down game and have your teenager continue practicing bringing arousal down so that he/she gets better and better at controlling it.

INDEPENDENCE AND DEFIANCE - Defiance is part of this developmental stage. Adolescent dogs will blow off cues! So make sure that you pick your battles. Cue when you know your can back it up with consequences for ignoring you. Capture and reward decisions as much as you can! Just like when they were itty-bitty puppies! Use your management tools. NEVER TRUST AN ADOLESCENT! Little puppies typically want to be near us, but teenagers want to explore their own independence and will wander off. This will be the time you need to keep your dog on leash.

Exercise Truths

Every dog needs a balance of exercise and rest. Yet, proper and effective exercise is often misunderstood. Dogs are like children. If we don’t give them something constructive to do with their energy, they will find something to do on their own - and it’s often not something that wins out approval! Many problem behaviors in dogs can arise simply from boredom or lack of exercise:

  • Destructive chewing
  • Inappropriate digging
  • Garbage raiding and counter surfing
  • Hyperactivity, excitability, and unruly play in the house
  • Nighttime activity
  • Excessive predatory and chasing activities
  • Excessive barking or whining
  • Rough play and jumping on people

Certain breeds are more prone to problem behaviors due to a lack of exercise. But the missed detail is what constitutes proper exercise. Over-excitement shifts to stress and anxiety. Frustration and change to fear. A young dog primarily indulging in high-arousal activities leads to excessive and unruly behavior and can lead to some bad habits:

  • Stress/anxiety and elevated cortisol levels
  • Over-excitement, jumping, mouthing
  • Unruly behavior, rough play
  • Excessive barking, whining
  • Aggression

Hormones play a significant role in behavior and can cause dogs to spin out of control, especially adolescent dogs. When a young dog gets over-excited or stressed, arousal levels rise, impulse control is lost, and the dog loses the ability to makecorrect decisions and forgets all the training you have worked so hard to achieve.

Physical Exercise

When most people think of exercise, they think of physical activity. The primary source is dog walks. But there is more to it than just walking. Exercise addresses the health of the body:

  • Helps dogs maintain a good weight and live longer (the #1 health problem in dogs is obesity)
  • Keeps dogs agile and limber
  • Builds muscle tone and structural integrity
  • reduces digestive issues and constipation

But physical exercise can also strengthen other aspects that might or might not work in your favor:

  • Builds stamina and endurance (causing the dog to want and need more)
  • Recovery time is relatively quick from simple physical activities

Unstructured Physical Exercise can also produce bad habits: ignoring the owner and blowing off cues. Every time you go outside with your dog, you set precedence for behavior. If your dog expects to go outside and just run it out, high-arousal behavior will escalate until you have a dog that does not listen to you when out. The anticipation of going outside will begin to build, and behaviors will start to surface before going outside until you have an unruly dog both inside and outside. Additionally, unstructured exercise, and especially exercise that does not require you, teaches your dog not to be mindful of you outside. For a dog to listen to you out in public, oreven your yard, you must set the stage and expectation with structure and training.

Structured Exercise builds good habits. Your concept games provide you with the tools to establish necessary default behaviors, good manners, listening to you, and strengthens your relationship. Plus, it combines both physical and mental workouts. That achieves some pretty amazing things:

  • Reduces boredom and prevents common behavior problems - reinforces good habits and good choices
  • Helps timid, anxious, and fearful dogs build confidence - provides positive experiences with familiar expectations
  • Facilitates a healthy relationshipbetween dog and owner
  • Builds trust between human and dog
  • Helps a dog settle and rest during the day and sleep at night - the dog is not over-stimulated
  • Provides opportunities to reinforce impulse control and training
  • Teaches your dog to focus and listen to you even when excited

Mental Exercise

Working the mind is a necessary component of exercise. Most dogs, and especially certain breeds, thrive on mental challenges and need “jobs” throughout the day. Mental stimulation causes the brain to release happy hormones, which makes the dog feel content. Dogs are intelligent and need mental exercise to feel satisfied. And the fatigue from mentalchallenges lasts much longer than physical activity alone. Training, brain games, and tricks help Working through impulse control can be exhausting! Sufficient mental stimulation can resolve hyperactivity, destructive behaviors, chewing, barking, and other undesired behaviors that physical exercise does not address. Activities to exercise your dog’s mind don’t have to be complicated, and your remote training program provides you with a ton of fun ways to fulfill your dog’s needs:

  • Structured conceptual games - exercises both mind and body
  • Trick training
  • Sniffing games
  • Fetch, tug and whip (with rules)

Find the right balance for your dog with physical and mental activities. That will help you tremendously in maintaining a forward progression in your relationship and your training.

TRAINING TOPICS


Generalization - Making Your Training Real

When you teach something new, the ideal place to do that is at home with little to no distractions. But there comes a time where you have to take the next step forward and practice elsewhere. Dogs think in pictures. So your dog has to go through the learning process of being able to do behaviors with different images. That is called Generalization.

Steps in Pictures for Generalization:

  1. At home, in a quiet room
  2. At home, in different rooms
  3. In the backyard
  4. In the front yard
  5. Out in front of your house and neighbor houses on either side of you
  6. Quiet public place (distractions far away)
  7. Quiet public place (distractions closer to you)
  8. On a walk (distractions depend on your area)
  9. Busy public place (distractions farther away)
  10. Busy public place (distractions closer to you)

In town (some to many distractions, some far, some close)

Make sure that you take this next step with your games and cues. Practice outside, on walks, at the park in between Frisbee and ball throws. Practice during real-life situations, so your dog learns to do the behavior and understands your expectations. Practice during meal prep, dining, working, watching TV, going out the door...

Seek out the distractions your dog needs to work through to be able to ignore them and focus on you. Elevate your value so that you can "out-do" the distraction. Pay well and utilize as many things as possible that are rewarding for your dog. Practicing allows you to be able to stack rewards and ensure the outcomes of following a cue or playing a game are all positive. Using cues in real-life situations doesn't always allow for good results from the perspective of your dog. They know when they miss out on something fun. So make practicing the norm and do it often.

Schedules of Reinforcement

As you go through training, and your puppy learnsvarious cues to proficiency, you can begin to change how you reinforce. Reinforcement needs to continue in order for the behavior to remain consistent, but how you reinforce can shift, and it can depend on what your goal is with the cue.

Games are part of your dog’s reinforcement rich life. Games also utilize rewards, but you have various ways in which you can reward your dog. Continue to build that flexible learner and utilize all sorts of rewards for variety and flexibility.